The Art Monk Hall of Fame Campaign

March 12, 2006

Sid Hartman

Filed under: Voter Articles — DjTj @ 1:29 am

Sid Hartman has been writing in Minneapolis since 1945.  He is one of the elder statesmen of the Hall of Fame voting committee.  Unfortunately, it’s hard to tell which way he votes on Art Monk, and my Star Tribune archives only extend back to 1992, just after the Super Bowl played in the Metrodome.

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Star Tribune
October 26, 1992
Vikings’ front four on line with the best
Sid Hartman

Defensively, the Vikings shut out Art Monk, the Redskins’ great receiver, until 10 minutes remained. But a great off-balance throw by Rypien to Monk was the key play on the Redskins’ march to the winning field goal.

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Star Tribune
February 1, 2004
Eller’s selection a big surprise
Sid Hartman

I pointed out that this same Hall of Fame committee had named Eller to the All-1970s team. And Eller had a lot of statistics in his favor, including being one of the career sack leaders with 138 1/2.

But the reason I was surprised is because the field was so tough. Elway and Sanders were a cinch to be two of the maximum six that can be voted in.

You had great candidates, like Chicago defensive end Richard Dent; Cliff Harris, Bob Hayes and Rayfield Wright from Dallas’ Super Bowl teams of the 1970s; Art Monk, maybe the greatest receiver to play for Washington; Miami offensive lineman Bob Kuechenberg; former Vikings and Broncos tackle Gary Zimmerman; and former New York Giants linebacker Harry Carson.

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